Still up to no good.

Kalai.

Fine Arts major in Advertising.

I love Science,
and Art.

I hate combing my hair.

I'm secretly a "Bird Lady."

And none of the photos are mine unless tagged as mine.

mssl-tts:

shmuffalo:

You must be thinking, “Who’s that badass?”

That’s Keiko Nobumoto. She was the head of Series Composition for Cowboy Bebop, as well as the screenwriter for a third of the series, including the first episode, all the two-parters, and the Faye-focused episodes.

She’s also the creator of Wolf’s Rain, had another jam with Shinichiro Watanabe as the writer of Macross Plus, and wrote the Satoshi Kon-directed classic Tokyo Godfathers, which I hope is part of your holiday movie playlist.

This season you’ll find her on the writing staff of Watanabe’s new TV series Space Dandy.

So let’s raise a glass to a writer who’s had a hell of an influence on our generation of storytellers.

♡♡♡

(via ricp)

thenearsightedmonkey:

Landscape from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE camera .  
Source:  HiRISE Catalog which contains over 11,700 images of Mars surface features.
The above image was taken in 2008 April near the North Pole of Mars. At that time, dark sand on the interior of Martian sand dunes became more and more visible as the spring Sun melted the lighter carbon dioxide ice.
When occurring near the top of a dune, dark sand may cascade down the dune leaving dark surface streaks — streaks that might appear at first to be trees standing in front of the lighter regions, but cast no shadows.
Objects about 25 centimeters across are resolved on this image spanning about one kilometer. Close ups of some parts of this image show billowing plumes indicating that the sand slides were occurring even when the image was being taken.
Source: ikenbot:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Landscape from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE camera .  

Source:  HiRISE Catalog which contains over 11,700 images of Mars surface features.

The above image was taken in 2008 April near the North Pole of Mars. At that time, dark sand on the interior of Martian sand dunes became more and more visible as the spring Sun melted the lighter carbon dioxide ice.

When occurring near the top of a dune, dark sand may cascade down the dune leaving dark surface streaks — streaks that might appear at first to be trees standing in front of the lighter regions, but cast no shadows.

Objects about 25 centimeters across are resolved on this image spanning about one kilometer. Close ups of some parts of this image show billowing plumes indicating that the sand slides were occurring even when the image was being taken.

Source: ikenbot:

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

221cbakerstreet:

awkwardsituationist:

quimmiq is the inuktituk word for the canadian eskimo dog (canis familiaris borealis), which after four thousand years in canada’s arctic faces imminent extinction, in large part due to a policy of eradication by the royal canadian mounted police meant to force the inuit into government settlement. brian ladoon, whose dogs we see here near churchill, manitoba, has been breeding quimmiq for over forty years and is largely responsible for maintaining the species.

so it was with much trepidation that brian noticed a group of polar bears, who eat quimmiq, approaching his dogs one day in 1992. though most of his dogs became quite defensive, one of them playfully ventured up to a polar bear and the two got on like old firends. every year since, the polar bears will stop by ladoon’s place to play with the dogs on their way to the newly iced over hudson bay.

these photos were taken by famed arctic photographer norbert rosing, who just happened to be with brian on that day in 1992. the canadian eskimo dog is still on the verge of extinction, with estimates of three hundred or less left. "the last dogs of winter" is a 2011 documentary on brian ladoon’s efforts

FRIENDS

(via shychemist)

fatbodypolitics:

odditiesoflife:

Lighted Fairy Woodhouses

Boston-based freelance artist Daniel Barreto combined houses with trees in a series of lovely photo manipulations titled Woodhouses. Barreto photographed parts of houses around Boston, and superimposed them onto images of tree trunks that he had taken in New Hampshire. The charming Woodhouses were even animated for effect, and resemble fairy’s houses in an enchanted forest. 

omg why can’t I be a fairy and live in a tree?

(Source: designtaxi.com, via hifructosemag)